Cilia Revolution

University of Southern Mississippi scientists imitated Mother Nature by developing a new, skinny-molecule-based material that resembles cilia, the tiny, hair-like structures through which organisms derive smell, vision, hearing and fluid flow.

PDFLink to the original paper on Wiley Online Library

Edible Electronics: Purely Biocompatible Electrical Devices

edible-electronics-devices

Scientists from the University of Linz engage in developing electronics that can simply be thrown onto the compost heap or, if in a pinch, could even be eaten!

PDFLink to the original paper on Wiley Online Library

Platinum and Light Together Fight Cancer

platinum-complex-cancer-treatment

For tumor treatment with few side effects: platinum complex initiates cytotoxic effect upon targeted irradiation with visible light.

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Life Before Advanced Materials?

Materials science is now well-established as an interdisciplinary field, but how was it in the early days? Professor Geoffrey Ozin recalls the challenges he faced when scientific research was still very traditionally classified–chemistry, physics, biology, engineering…

Super-Sensitive SERS

By studying the thermal effects in SERS, scientists may be able to drastically alter the sensitivity of their system and provide vital information for the design of new SERS probes.

PDFLink to the original paper on Wiley Online Library

Crystalline Control

Polymer crystallinity

The subtleties of polymer crystallization enable easier low-temperature processing and control of properties.

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Piezotronic Logic Gates Take the Strain

US scientists have developed the first examples of logic gates (NAND, NOR and XOR gates) that can be switched simply by bending the substrate.

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Quantum Dot Monolayers

Materials scientists from the USA have made a thin layer of quantum dots on a photonic crystal surface, thereby creating a stable material with enhanced emission properties.

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Bottom-Up Meets Top-Down for Simple Surface Stripes

A simple way to create very small patterns on a surface by using a mixture of top-down and bottom-up technology has been developed. Self-assembly is combined with evaporation to make highly ordered nanoscale structures.

PDFLink to the original paper on Wiley Online Library

MaterialsViews Interviews: Yanglong Hou

Yanglong Hou

MaterialsViews interviews Yanglong Hou of Peking University on nanobiotechnology and magnetic nanoparticles.