Carbononics – a new special issue in pss RRL

A Carbononics special issue in pss RRL – integrating electronics, photonics and spintronics with graphene quantum dots.

Nitrogen Doping of Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites

Researchers from the University of Calgary in Canada and Washington State University Tri-Cities in the US manipulated the structure of CNTs by introducing nitrogen between carbon atoms in CNTs, and succeeded in improving the charge storage capacity of CNT/polymer nanocomposites.

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Porous molybdenum-based nanocomposites for efficient hydrogen evolution

Researchers develop nanoscale materials that can improve the activities and stabilities of HER catalysts.

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An all-around motion sensor from graphene fiber

Researchers in China make a stretchable graphene-based motion sensor that can monitor all types of human activities with ultrahigh sensitivity.

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Custom Fit: Self-Wrapping 3D Electronics

A team of researchers at Stanford University has developed shape-controlled, self-wrapping electronics based on carbon nanotubes.

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Graphene-wrapped sulfur makes for better batteries

Chinese researchers have developed a graphene-based composite material to improve the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries.

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International Year of Light: Carbon Nanotube Photodetectors

Different types of photodetectors realized with carbon nanotubes are presented in this comprehensive review article.

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Combing Carbon Nanotube Films for Strong and Conductive Buckypapers

Prof. Zhu and his co-workers from North Carolina State University have used a traditional method to advance CNT thin film production.

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Following the Roadmap to Improved Lithium-Ion Batteries

Jim Yang Lee and colleagues have designed a clever method to apply the concept of traffic engineering to the electron transport in lithium-ion batteries.

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Busy bees fuel the semiconductor sector

A team of researchers from Hefei, China use bee pollens in the synthesis of carbon dots with applications in bioimaging and catalysis.

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