Graphene-like material could improve transistor technology

A single macroscopic flake of TGCN.

Triazine-based graphitic carbon nitride has the potential to improve transistors used in electronic devices.

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Doping graphene boron nitride hetrostructures with light

Researchers have demonstrated a technique whereby the electronic properties of GBN heterostructures can be modified with visible light.

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Atomically thin solar cells

Atomically Thin Solar Cells 01

Ultrathin layers made of tungsten and selenium may be used as flexible, semi-transparent solar cells.

Biosensor combines graphene and mu-opioid receptor

The researchers were able to fit 192 separate graphene-receptor devices on this chip.

Researchers create an artificial chemical sensor based on one of the human body’s most important receptors.

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New lig in town: Renewable hybrid electrode based on lignin confined on reduced graphene oxide

ligin-capacitor

A renewable hybrid electrode consisting of lignin nanocrystals confined on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) is developed for energy storage materials.

New graphene material is reinforced with nanotube bars

A square-centimeter sheet of rebar graphene floats in water. The rebars allow the sheet to be transferred from one surface from another without using polymer in an intermediate step. The process was created in the lab of chemist James Tour at Rice University. Image: Tour Group/Rice University.

Rice University lab makes hybrid nanotube-graphene material that promises to simplify manufacturing.

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A new class of graphene-based electronics?

Walt de Heer, a Regent’s professor in the School of Physics at the Georgia Institute of Technology, poses with equipment used to measure the properties of graphene nanoribbons. De Heer and collaborators from three other institutions have reported ballistic transport properties in graphene nanoribbons that are about 40 nanometers wide. Image: Georgia Tech/Rob Felt.

Using electrons more like photons could provide the foundation for a new type of electronic device.

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100% stretchable graphene nanopaper

Gloves with motion detectors incorporating the graphene sensors.

Researchers in Singapore have developed method to fabricate stretchable graphene nanopaper for use in strain detectors.

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Significant development in graphene synthesis

Researchers from MPI Mainz have succeeded in producing remarkably long, structurally well-defined and liquid-phase-processable graphene nanoribbons.

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Book review: Carbon nanotubes and graphene for photonic applications

Carbon nanotubes and graphene for photonic applications

Mildred Dresselhaus reviews Carbon nanotubes and graphene for photonic applications, released this year by Woodhead Publishing.