Advanced Optical Materials – June Issue Covers

Check out the articles highlighted on the covers of the latest issue of Advanced Optical Materials.

Oxygen Nanocarrier for Combined Cancer Therapy

This nanocarrier shows excellent oxygen-carrying properties and ATP-responsive drug release, which makes it a potent agent for cancer therapy.

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Molecular Polymer Brushes in Nanomedicine

In a recent Talent article, Markus Müllner highlights the diverse applications of molecular polymer brushes in nanomedicine.

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A Single Method for Nanofiber Ropes, Cables, and Coatings

A scalable method to produce polymer nanofibers in a variety of different morphologies is presented.

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High-Performance Supercapacitors from Nickel Foam

Researchers from Singapore have grown nanoporous nickel sulfide on nickel foam to generate promising electrodes for supercapacitors.

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Advanced Optical Materials – May Issue Covers

The latest issue of Advanced Optical Materials is now available.

A biomass-derived porous carbon matrix with carbon nanotubes for enhanced Li-S battery performance

Researchers from the Hefei University of Technology and University of Science and Technology of China have improved the cathode performance in lithium-sulfur batteries by embedding carbon nanotube networks within porous carbon.

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Electrolytes for improved safety of Li-Ion batteries

Renjie Chen and co-workers developed a nanogelator-based solid electrolyte that improves the safety of Li-ion batteries.

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Advanced Optical Materials Top 5 – May 2016

The month’s top articles from the field of nanooptics, optoelectronics, optical devices, detectors & sensors, micro/nano resonators and more.

New transparent luminous pigments

Research scientists at the Leibniz-Institute for New Materials have developed luminous particles that can also withstand high temperatures. When activated by UV light or x-rays, they glow orange red.